November Is Diabetes Awareness Month; Pro Golfer’s Eyes Checked At Vanderbilt University...

November Is Diabetes Awareness Month; Pro Golfer’s Eyes Checked At Vanderbilt University Using Latest Technologies Developed by Leading Companies



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NASHVILLE, Tenn.–(HISPANIC PR WIRE – BUSINESS WIRE)–Nov. 10, 2003–Approximately 18 million people in the U.S. live with a biological time bomb – because they are diabetic, they are at risk for permanent loss of vision. To help doctors diagnose people at risk for diabetic eye disease sooner and implement treatment during its earliest phases, the medical profession is using techniques that combine traditional medical techniques with the latest digital imaging, software and distribution technologies.

November is diabetes awareness month, and LPGA Tour golfer Michelle McGann, who is diabetic, today had her eyes checked at the Vanderbilt University Ophthalmic Imaging Center in Nashville. Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of adult-onset blindness, and early detection can prevent blindness in over 90 percent of such cases.

At Vanderbilt, as at many similar ophthalmic imaging centers, patients can have their eyes examined while providers monitor the pathology, review diagnoses with flexible software in a paperless system, conduct long-range diagnostic consultation and provide a host of other clinical and non-clinical applications.

The unique non-invasive design of Canon’s Eye Q Digital Retinal Imaging System simplifies diabetic eye screening and eliminates the process of dilating a patient’s eye. The system provides faster and more accurate information about the disease than conventional methods, and it assists doctors with the diagnosis of the disease and improves the capability to provide superior ophthalmic/optometric care to patients

The BellSouth networking technology enables doctors in outlying clinics to take detailed, high-resolution images of patients’ retinas and use a high-speed DSL or frame relay data connection to send the digital images directly to the VOIC. By combining imaging technologies, Vanderbilt’s leading ophthalmic care and BellSouth’s high-speed data solutions, diabetic patients unable to come to a major medical center now have access to this innovative new model of healthcare Vanderbilt offers.

Software, based on Microsoft’s .NET architecture, was designed by Digital Healthcare, the Cambridge UK- based software company that develops “care pathway based” large- scale population screening technology. Microsoft’s .NET architecture allows care pathways and rule based technology to be developed quickly and deployed locally. Digital Healthcare and the Medical Systems Division of Canon U.S.A. recently entered into a technology access and license agreement giving Canon access to the Digital Healthcare software. Such access is expected to enable Canon to introduce new versions of its Eye Q Retinal Imaging System in 2004.

For more information about diabetic eye screening, contact Lawrence Merin, Assistant Professor of Ophthalmology and Director of the Vanderbilt Ophthalmic Imaging Center at 615/ 936-3247 or lawrence.merin@vanderbilt.edu.

Note: A photo is available at URL: http://www.businesswire.com/cgi-bin/photo.cgi?pw.110703/bb4

–30–KF/ny*

CONTACT:

Canon U.S.A., Inc.

Mike Virgintino, 516-328-4825

November Is Diabetes Awareness Month; Pro Golfer’s Eyes Checked At Vanderbilt University Using Latest Technologies Developed by Leading Companies