Susan G. Komen for the Cure and Telenovela Star, Adamari Lopez Urge...

Susan G. Komen for the Cure and Telenovela Star, Adamari Lopez Urge Hispanic Women to Learn about Breast Cancer, Early Detection is Key to Saving Lives

Hispanic women 20 percent more likely to die of breast cancer than non-Hispanic white women


SHARE THIS ARTICLE

Dallas, TX–(HISPANIC PR WIRE)–October 24, 2007–October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month and Susan G. Komen for the Cure has enlisted the help of Latina telenovela actress and breast cancer survivor, Adamari Lopez, to help spread the word on breast health.

Adamari recently participated in a national Spanish-language radio media tour encouraging Latinas to break their silence and talk to their families, sisters, mothers, friends and doctors about breast cancer and the importance of early detection.

On recent radio interviews across the U.S., Ms. Lopez told listeners that Komen for the Cure’s Web site, http://www.komen.org, offers Spanish-language information about breast health and breast cancer — an ideal way to begin a conversation or share information about a disease that has a profound impact on Hispanic women.

She also mentioned Komen’s breast health Helpline, 1-800 I’M AWARE (1-800-462-9273), which offers the assistance of specially trained Spanish-speaking volunteers who can answer questions and provide links to breast health and breast cancer resources. The Helpline service is available Monday through Friday from 9 to 5 p.m. central time.

Ms. Lopez often says she is a proud spokesperson of Susan G. Komen, pointing out that the organization and its more than 125 nationwide Affiliates, is instrumental in reaching Latina women and providing them with connections to community-based screening and treatment programs. Affiliate locations and contact numbers are available on http://www.komen.org or by asking Helpline volunteers.

Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer (other than non-melanoma skin cancer) in U.S. women. It is estimated that there will be more than 178,000 new breast cancer diagnoses in U.S. women in 2007 and roughly 40,000 breast cancer deaths. Only 38 percent of Hispanic women age 40 or older have regular mammograms.

Because Hispanic and Latino women tend to be diagnosed at later stages, breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths among that population group. Some Latinas, particularly those who are new to the United States or who do not have health insurance are unaware of the importance or the availability of early detection techniques, such as clinical breast examinations or screening mammography that could find breast cancers early, when they are most treatable. Other challenges, such as language barriers, distrust of doctors and medicine and cultural differences are barriers that keep many Latinas from seeking the breast cancer screening or treatment that could save their lives.

Consider these facts regarding breast cancer among Latinas:

— Breast cancer among Hispanic women is more frequently diagnosed at a later stage than when found in non-Hispanic white women.

— Hispanic women are 20 percent more likely to die of breast cancer than non-Hispanic white women diagnosed at a similar age and stage.

— Hispanic women are more likely to be diagnosed with larger tumors.

Susan G. Komen for the Cure, the world’s largest grassroots network of breast cancer survivors and activists fighting to save lives and end breast cancer forever is using its vast resources to help Latino women reduce the odds of developing breast cancer. The organization is implementing programs to raise funds for breast cancer research and to educate women about the importance of breast health. Some of the programs the organization is offering in its battle against breast cancer are:

— Passionately Pink for the Cure(TM) – Asking only a $5.00 donation per-person, Passionately Pink encourages participants to wear pink to raise funds for research and build breast cancer awareness. Visit http://www.passionatelypink.com to learn more.

— Komen Race for the Cure(TM) – a series of 5K runs/walks around the country to raise funds and create awareness. Visit http://www.komen.org to find a race in your city.

— Komen for the Cure Promise Ring – symbolizing the unbroken promise of two sisters to end breast cancer forever the Promise Rings come as a set (two for $5) – one to wear and one to share – and can be purchased online at komen.org.

More information on additional programs to help find the cure can be found at http://www.komen.org ; Free brochures and informative Spanish-language resources that teach women how to look and feel for any breast changes are also available online.

About Susan G. Komen for the Cure

In 1982, Nancy G. Brinker promised her dying sister, Susan G. Komen, she would do everything in her power to end breast cancer forever. That promise became Susan G. Komen for the Cure and launched the global breast cancer movement. Today, Komen for the Cure is the world’s largest grassroots network of breast cancer survivors and activists fighting to save lives, empower people, ensure quality care for all and energize science to find the cures. Thanks to events like the Komen Race for the Cure(R), we have invested nearly $1 billion to fulfill our promise, becoming the largest source of nonprofit funds dedicated to the fight against breast cancer in the world. For more information about Susan G. Komen for the Cure, breast health or breast cancer, visit http://www.komen.org or call 1-800 I’M AWARE.

Susan G. Komen for the Cure and Telenovela Star, Adamari Lopez Urge Hispanic Women to Learn about Breast Cancer, Early Detection is Key to Saving Lives